Oregon’s Decriminalization of All Psychedelics

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Madison Fouty, Staff Writer

Oregon legalized marijuana back in 2015, becoming one of the first of many states to legalize it. The spectrum of the legalization of drugs is and has been broadening for the past few years at a rapid pace. States are continuing to legalize the use and possession of this drug more and more. Oregon is now the first state to officially decriminalize the following list: cocaine, heroin, oxycodone, methamphetamines, and psychedelics. 

One of Oregon’s main concerns was how many of their citizens were addicted to and abused hard drugs. According to the Oregon Nurses Association, the Oregon Chapter American College of Physicians, and the Oregon Academy of Family Physicians, one in 11 Oregonians is addicted to drugs and nearly 2 people die every day from overdoses in the state. This will drastically help Oregon in their fight to prevent hard drug usage in their communities. 

The decriminalization of these drugs and the decreased drug usage will also help to decrease the crime rate in the state. Oregon has a very high rate of citizens convicted or charged with misdemeanors for possession of controlled substances. With this new law in place, it was estimated by the Oregon Criminal Justice Commission that about 3,700 fewer Oregonians per year will be convicted or charged. This gradual decrease will help Oregon remain a safer state all together. 

While under these new conditions, another main concern is safety of drug use. With all these new legal substances, many  will most likely be ingested in more common situations. With this in mind, the drug user needs to be aware of how a substance can affect you and to still do them in safe and appropriate environments. 

Oregon has dominated in the fight for justice for psychedelics and other “hard drugs.” This is a very big step in the race for justice, and many Oregonians are currently very proud of their state. This will be revolutionary. Hopefully, Oregon will grow and maintain a safer and less substance abuse induced community.