Drinking and Driving

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Drinking and Driving

Ally Hannan, Staff Writer

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Each day, 29 people die due to someone being intoxicated while driving. People are at risk when their blood alcohol concentration otherwise known as BAC, is at 0.08% or higher. The risk of getting into a crash is higher among young people than old. Alcohol is a substance that reduces the function of the brain, which impairs thinking, mobility, and reasoning. There are many effects of having a BAC of 0.08% or higher on a person’s driving. Some include, speed control, impaired perception, reduced ability to sustain lane position and the ability to brake. 

There are laws in place to try and prevent these accidents from happening such as the legal drinking age of 21. Some additional preventions that may help these growing numbers is raising the price of alcohol and or the drinking age, or the use of breathalyzers when one leaves a place where alcohol would be consumed. 

Other simple ways to reduce the risk of having a drunk driver would be designating a driver who doesn’t drink, otherwise known as a DD. You can also take precautions by taking the keys of your friends who you know are under the influence of alcohol. Another way to make it home safely would be to call a taxi, Uber, or Lyft instead of driving yourself.  

Some consequences of drinking and driving include a DUI and license suspension, jail time depending on the blood alcohol concentration level in your body, fines, and an ignition interlock device. If you are intoxicated and cause an accident, including the death of another person, then it will result in a felony charge resulting in going to prison for 3-15 years.

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